Join us this Sunday for a special edition of the Classic Country Jukebox. Sunday we'll feature all your favorite country music from the 1970s. From 9 a.m. to noon you'll hear artists from the '70s like:

  • Kenny Rogers
  • Johnny Cash
  • Charlie Rich
  • Glen Campbell
  • Crystal Gayle
  • Ronnie Milsap
  • John Denver
  • Emmylou Harris
  • Charlie Daniels

If there's a song you'd like to hear email Ally@XLCountry.com.

As we take a trip back to the '70s this weekend, we'd like to take a stroll down memory lane and remember the following iconic moments from the decade:

  • "Coal Miner's Daughter" was released in 1970 by Loretta Lynn and soon became a number one hit on the Billboard country chart.
  • Loretta Lynn and Conway Twitty hit No. 1 their first duo, "After the Fire Is Gone" in 1971.
  • John Denver released "Take Me Home, Country Roads" in April of 1971, and the song went on to be a hit on the country charts and on the Billboard Hot 100 as well.
  • Loretta Lynn was the first woman named Entertainer of the Year at the CMA Awards in 1972. She won against Merle Haggard, Freddie Hart, Charley Pride, and Jerry Reed.
  • The Grand Ole Opry relocated to its current location in 1974 from the historic Ryman Auditorium.
  • In the mid-‘70s the Outlaw Movement took hold and "outlaws" like Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, David Allan Coe and a host of others grew in popularity.
  • Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner parted ways in 1974 and to wish Wagoner farewell, Parton wrote "I Will Always Love You," which became iconic and hit No. 1 in June of 1974. Earlier that year Dolly Parton's "Jolene" became a No. 1 hit in 1974.
  • Reba McEntire signed her first record deal in 1975 after impressing Red Stegall while performing the National Anthem at the National Finals Rodeo in Oklahoma City, Okla.
  • The Electric Horseman starring Willie Nelson was released in 1979. Nelson was busy that year and also released "My Heroes Have Always Been Cowboys," "Midnight Rider," and "Mammas Don't Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys."

 

SEE: 30 Toys That Defined the '70s